Bressan

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Bressan – Friuli – Isonzo

Located in Farra d’Isonzo, an outpost of the Collio Goriziano, in Friuli Venezia Giulia, the BRESSAN winery is quite unique. In today’s tempestuous ocean of industrial quick fixes and short cuts, BRESSAN Mastri Vinai is a philosophical lighthouse, a beacon of Quality to help steer all ailing vinous sailors to shore.
No surprise that philosophy is one of their winemaking secrets.

Fulvio Bressan represents the 9th generation of winemakers carrying the Bressan name and working a small plot of land in the Farra d’Isonzo since 1726. And given the way he runs his winery, you would think that he might just be channeling all 9 generations of prior expertise, with little care for how the rest of the world might make their wines.

In the vineyard, ‘IF’ and ‘ONLY IF’ the vineyard deems it necessary, Fulvio says only natural fertilisers from the barn may be employed. ALL chemical and synthetic products including pesticides and herbicides are banned. With all vines pruned to 4-5 buds, the BRESSAN vineyards are also farmed dry, as in, not irrigated. Fulvio pointed out that where their vineyards lie, it’s not far from the Isonzo river. Here the relatively poor gravel topped soil composition encourages vine roots to channel deep to find their life-saving water source. On this raised part of the Isonzo plain, at a depth of 5 metres, it’s a nutrient rich, stress free zone. The vines simply love it. Fulvio emphasized how dry farming is essential for any grower who wants to maintain the authentic wealth and intensity of the grapes aromatic profile. Recognising the value of his vineyard locations, you begin to understand why BRESSAN wines are uniquely BRESSAN. 

As a curious footnote to the dry farming topic, although Friuli is considered Italy’s wettest region, in recent years we’ve begun to observe the introduction of vineyard irrigation drip systems in both low and high ground locations. Used for emergencies to combat issues associated with increasingly common summer droughts, it suggests that climate change is a real and growing concern in these parts.

Low interventionalist, he isn’t certified as organic or biologic even if his personal rules impose conditions in the vineyard and wine-cellar that are more severe than those of various “certifications”.

Fulvio studied in France, under the guidance of Professor Yves Glories from the legendary University of Bordeaux Oenology Department. He absorbed all that Glories imparted, explaining how he learned his role in the creative process is truly a supportive one.